dementia

  • Why you need to know about Dignified Dining for All

    We have been banging on about dignified dining for over 18 months now, since the launch of our Dignified Dining Solutions Guide in fact, back in June 2017. In case you missed that launch, you can catch Jo talking about here - go ahead and watch it now, we'll wait.

    We know that the tools, tips and guidance included in the Dignified Dining Solutions Guide can make a marked difference to those in your care, from individuals in the home to those in care homes. We’re offering you the chance to get this 34 page guide, worth over £5.99 for FREE!

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    Here’s what a few other people think about it -

    "My daughter is 12 years old she has a diagnosis of down's syndrome, oral dysphagia, autism, sensory processing disorder and food intolerances. I have only been able to give her pureed or mashed food which she was not particularly interested in.  She is assisted at meal times. The first time she say saw her food moulded dinner, she shouted, "Carrots!". The next time, she wants to know what every bit of food was on her plate. This time I had used parsnips in the carrot mould, "What's that? What's that?!" she said as SHE used a fork to scoop up pieces of dinner onto her fork and into her mouth with glee. But what's most important to me is that my daughter is beginning to enjoy meal times and showing greater independent all because her food is now moulded."

    Mrs Dewey, Private Customer

    "We have been auditing noise levels at mealtimes and have noticed that by making simple changes to the way we manage the mealtime experience. Our residents are much less distracted, and are clearing their plates rather than picking at their meals. So we are delighted to be seeing improved levels of nutrition and less wastage" 

    Donna Butcher, Woodleigh Care group

    Airedale NHS Foundation Trust has been working to improve the acute care environment for people with dementia in hospital. "We have introduced the coloured crockery range and had some excellent feedback on how this has made a difference"

    Fiona Throp - Senior Nurse for Older People - Airedale NHS Foundation Trust

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    Learn how one simple change, can help someone to smile like this -

    See the difference one simple thing can make to someone's life. A smile can speak volumes. This is Jackie, with her yellow plate.

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  • 4 Year Olds and Singing - Some of the best ways to keep age at bay!

    There've been some lovely, heartwarming stories recently about how we can help those with a dementia to live with dignity and to help their memory. Dame Barbara Windsor watches her old Carry On films and others chose to sing to old songs, in fact one group have been singing for 10 years!

    A group in Beaconsfield have been singing together for 10 years helping hundreds of people with dementia, and their carers. The group, called "Singing for the brain" was visited by the town mayor to celebrate the success. 

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  • The Healthcare Extreme Makeover - Home Edition!

    We are delighted to bring you a project we're very proud to be helping on, the refurbishment of 18 rooms at Red Rose Care Home in Newark.

    Red Rose Care have a history of achieving excellence and the newly refurbished rooms are adding to these high standards by offering end of life care facilities.

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  • All the Latest from Healthcare HQ!

    It's been a little whilst since we last posted here and this is in no small part to some of the work we've been doing behind the scenes at Healthcare Services UK. You may already have noticed that we have improved the search function on the website to return better results for you. We are also working on improving the information on the website on each product, so you've got a better idea of the right products for you to use and to help you find them first time, every time.

    We've also been watching the news for interesting stories about progress in the battle against dementia, helpful tips and tools for caring for those with a dementia, and building up more resources and guides for you all to use to that end too.  There will be much more on that in the coming months.

    We'd like to share some of those stories below with you all now.

    A town hall which is offering film screenings Wem Town Hall where a new Dementia Friendly screening has taken place.

    This is Wem Town Hall, where on Monday 17th December, there was a "Singing Session" where those with a dementia, and their carers, could attend and enjoy singing along to classic movie songs.

    We've previously mentioned other groups in the country who arrange these important events where carers and those with a dementia can enjoy some social time and respite. We will continue to share this news and we hope to have many more to tell you about!

    Passion for care

    The passion at the heart of Healthcare Services UK comes direct from the heart of our MD, Jo Bonser. If you have not yet heard about Jo's story and why helping those with a dementia is so important to her, then we urge you to head over here and watch the video.

    Jo Bonser, MD of Hcsuk, leading a workshop on dementia and hydration and nutrition. Jo leading a workshop earlier this year talking about helping those with a dementia to eat and drink better.

    In Case You Missed It!

    November 27th was "Tasty Suppers" day, a day set up by the team behind Nutrition and Hydration week. The day, along with the other awareness day of Thirsty Thursday is designed to remind us of the importance of keeping those in our care well fed and cared for. We have a range of product solutions to help you with this, some of which are shown in the image on the right.

    These include plates and bowls which keep food warmer for longer, adapted cutlery which is easier to hold for those with limited strength in their hands and reduced mobility and cup and mugs with lids to both keep things warm and help reduce spillages.

    You can see more products on the website. 

    Keep popping back because there will be more to come, both in updates on the website but also with our other services and how we keep you informed of what we're up to here at Hcsuk.

     

  • How can Hcsuk help you to reduce the number of falls in your care home?

    This week is Falls Prevention Week September 22nd-28th and we wanted to get you all thinking about what you could do to reduce the risks of falls in your homes, make you aware of some statistics around falls in care homes and also to tell you about our unique and best selling Falls Management Solutions.

    • According to L Z Rubenstein Falls in Older People study, falls account for 40% of all injury deaths which occur in care homes.

    • Falls are 5 times more likely to occur in care homes than in the community (WHO)

    • One in ten care home residents who fall sustain a fracture

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  • MD Jo Is Honoured To Be Presenting National Interactive Workshop

    Yayy! I’m absolutely thrilled and honoured to have been invited to present an interactive workshop, ‘To Help People with a Dementia to Eat Better’, at this year’s National Association of Care Catering (NACC) training and development forum coming up in October.

    The NACC is an organisation who, for more than 30 years, has been committed to raising standards of care catering and championing the positive impact nutrition, hydration and mealtimes have on the physical and emotional health and wellbeing of the elderly and vulnerable in care settings. It unites supports and represents everyone working in and associated with catering in the UK care sector. It is recognised as a respected source of information and opinion for the dynamic and growing area of care catering.

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  • National Dementia Carers’ Day

     

    Today we want to help celebrate and support all those very important people who care from someone with a dementia.

    Dementia is an incredibly cruel affliction for both those who have a dementia, and those who care for them, making that care work very difficult and draining. Through our work with care home managers, individuals who care for their nearest and dearest and our personal experience,  we know how taxing this can be.

    In this email we've selected a few of the resources we think can help you as a carer and we want to say a very heartfelt "Thank You" for all that you do.

    Our recent blog on activity groups for carers will point in the right direction for a breather and a chat with people in the same position.

    And here's a personal story from our MD, Jo Bonser, talking about her experiences with her own mum who has vascular dementia.

    For more practical advice to help those in your care, you can view all our dementia care blogs(including product tips and lots of advice).

     

    Thank you for all that you do for those in your care. We know how hard it is and how much it means.

  • How activity groups can help you when you care for a loved one with a dementia

    Caring for a loved one with a dementia can be challenging, tiring and lonely for relatives and carers, and so often we forget that we need to look after ourselves too.

    Jo Bonser, MD of Hcsuk, speaks from her own personal experience, having taken 4 months away from work to care for her own Mum, aged 97, living at home with vascular dementia.

    ‘My Mum would get extremely anxious if I was to leave the room,  just to make a cup of tea, and would even follow me and shout at me for nipping out for a much needed loo break! So my days were spent sitting beside her in the same room from the time she got up until going to bed, with her repeatedly asking me the same questions – it was exhausting. Luckily I had my Border Collie, Hollie,  living with us and my daily sanctuary came when a carer would relieve me for an hour and so I could get out in the fresh air and walk in nature, one of my favourite things to do.’

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  • What Memories Are Made Of

    Engaging in reminiscence can powerfully impact the wellbeing of a person living with dementia, as it stimulates communication and helps to trigger their existing memories. Reminiscing can also assist in the creation of new memories, as discussing life history inspires new conversations that can be shared with caregivers and loved ones.

    People living with dementia cope with high levels of stress every day. This, understandably, often makes them defensive, guarded and difficult for others to approach. Reminiscent activities help a person coping with memory loss to build confidence as they recognise their belongings. This allows them to feel less stress, making them less aggressive and able to live happier lives.

     

    The information gathered though reminiscence also provides caregivers, family members and loved ones with valuable insight into an individuals history. This information can be used to start conversations or to help a person with dementia feel more at ease when they feel distressed.

    This is incredibly useful as people living with dementia struggle to create or retain new memories and might still remember themselves to be of a younger age. Startling themselves when they look into a mirror and see an elderly face staring back at them.

    Memories and stories of the past can help loved ones deal with a dementia.

    It is for these reasons that it is extremely beneficial for a person living with dementia, in addition to those around them, to engage in reminiscence. It prevents the discomfort that accompanies confusion, making life more enjoyable for everyone.

    Not sure where to start? One way to partake in reminiscent activities is through the use of a Memory Box. A Memory Box is a secure, personal display cabinet for the safe-keeping of personal memorabilia.

    From family photos, to holiday souvenirs to favourite recipes, a Memory Box holds recognisable keepsakes that help trigger the existing memories of those coping with memory loss. They also assist in the creation of new memories as the boxes contents inspires conversations with caregivers, family members and loved ones.

    Memory Boxes are used extensively in care homes, typically placed outside a resident’s room. These extraordinary products are a practical and attractive tool that provide numerous benefits including:

    1. Excellent aids to orientation.

    2. Stimulating conversational interaction.

    3. Providing care givers with valuable insight into an individual’s life history.

    4. Reinforcing the confidence of the user, as they are able to recognise their items.

    5. Creating an attractive point of interest.

    A nurse from Sandridge House speaks about her experience with Memory Boxes stating, “We have had great response from the Service User's themselves as well as their relatives. I am in the Activities Department and often use the boxes as a reminiscing aid as well as the Service User's often looking at them of their own accord when they enter or leave their bedrooms. They are a great way to display pictures from the past or present and have enough room in them to place any special nik-naks or treasured possessions.”

    Another nurse speaks about her patient’s experience with Memory Boxes stating, “Joan’s Memory Box empowered her to become independent again. Now she can find her own room she smiles again and is no longer angry, frightened or anxious. It’s been a huge boost to her confidence, dignity and well-being.” How amazing is that?

    Memory Care also offer an internally illuminated Memory Box option which ensures the boxes contents can always be seen, even at night time!

    More information on the Memory Boxes can be found on our website.

    A seaside memory box

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  • Hello, my name is Jo, I’m the Yellow Plate Lady!

    I have been called many things in my time, a few of them choice, but my favourite, by far, is the ‘Yellow Plate Lady’.

    Let me explain ......... I met a care home manager, Katie, at an exhibition several years ago where I was talking about the significance of using colourful crockery for ladies and gents living with Dementia, to provide contrast between their food and their plates to aid improved recognition and enable more independent and dignified dining experiences.

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