dementia

  • How to create visually appealing, appetising and delicious tasting meals for the people you support with swallowing difficulties.

    We all eat with our eyes first. A plate full of food needs to visually stimulate us first to whet our appetite, to get those taste buds tingling and the saliva flowing. Colours, shapes, delicious aromas and the arrangement of food on a plate all play an important part in our mealtime experience.

    But what if, due to complex health needs, for your own safety, your meals had to be pureed for you, like baby food? How would you feel? How do you think that might affect your appetite?

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  • How to ensure that every mouthful of food stays hot, delicious and enjoyable for the people you support who eat slowly.

    Do you know anyone who enjoys eating food that’s gone cold?

    What would you do if your food was served cold? You would send it back if you were in a restaurant or reheat it if you were at home. If it was really cold you might lose your appetite and give up on the idea of eating it at all.

    What if, due to a physical or cognitive condition, it takes you longer to eat your meals?

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  • Living with Dementia, where does love end and duty begin? Or does it?

    There was not a dry eye in the house when I saw a recent staging of Brian Daniels play Don’t Leave Me Now, which explores the impact of early onset Dementia and family life.

    Brian’s inspiration for writing this came from two families he met, both of whom were caring for and supporting loved ones living with a Dementia in their own homes, and he tells the stories of their journeys with both insight and humour.

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  • Helping Care Homes to Deliver Excellent Oral Care to the People They Support

    On September 20th we held our first CPD accredited seminar which focussed on providing great oral care for elderly and vulnerable residents in care homes and also to enable care homes to become compliant with the new CQC quality standards in oral care.

    All of our delegates learnt how to take a person centred approach to better assess and manage oral care for the people they support, gained knowledge about the latest innovative and fit for purpose product solutions to use (and more importantly which products to avoid) and they also got the chance to practice on each other, even our MD Jo didn’t escape without being a guinea pig!

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  • Our top coping strategies to help improve oral care for your residents with a Dementia

    Our top 10 coping strategies to help you to improve oral care for your residents with a Dementia

    One of the biggest challenges we know you face, because it is one of the most frequently asked questions we get asked regarding oral care is:

    How can I deliver more effective oral care for my residents with a Dementia?

    It is fact that your residents with a Dementia are most likely to present your care staff with the greatest challenges regarding delivering effective oral care, as they are more likely to resist tooth brushing. This is often a response to fear or a previous bad experience.

    And with the number of people with a Dementia who have their own teeth expected to rise significantly, if oral care is not carried out, a vicious circle of pain and discomfort, leading to increased resistance becomes likely.

    Those people who have advanced Dementia may not be able to verbally communicate pain and discomfort in their mouths, and this may manifest itself in other ways such as crying, pulling or hitting their faces, hitting out at care staff or being very passive.

    To compound this, many carers have little or no experience of training in delivering good oral care and there is a lack of good quality, safe and fit for propose oral care product solutions available on the market.

    If you would like to learn more to enhance the oral care in your care home, get CQC ready for the new oral care quality standards, and demonstrate that your home is effective and responsive to CQC, join us at our latest event:

    Our first CPD accredited training seminar:

    ‘How to achieve CQC compliancy in oral care for adults in care homes’

    Please click on the link to learn more and book your place at this popular event

    The important thing to remember is that as with all other aspects of care, there is no standard one size fits all solution.

    A good oral health plan, in 3 stages, should be created for each resident which is specific to their own individual needs.

    Stage 1

    On admission a risk assessment should be completed to ascertain the oral health needs of your resident.

    Stage 2

    A care plan should be created from the findings of the risk assessment.

    Stage 3

    The care plan should be followed and documented at regular intervals dependant on the findings of the risk assessment and both should be reviewed at least every 12 months.

    Always encourage independent brushing where possible

    Always try to encourage your residents to brush their teeth for themselves for as long as they are able to do so, to promote their independence and dignity for as long as possible.

    Sometimes, residents will forget that they need to brush their teeth, and a reminder to brush is all that is needed.

    Some residents may be able to brush their teeth, when prompted, with some assistance. Try using the Chaining or the Bridging methods to help support your resident to brush their teeth themselves.

    The Chaining Method – Place your hand over your resident’s hand and guide them as they brush.

    The Bridging Method – Standing in front of the resident, brush your own teeth so that they can copy and follow your actions.

    For residents who are non compliant with tooth brushing.

    If you have residents who refuse to brush or have their teeth brushed, try to understand this behaviour as a sign of distress rather than thinking that the resident is choosing to be aggressive and uncooperative. Remember, this is often a response to fear or a previous bad experience.

    We do need to respect peoples’ decision should they decline from wanting their teeth brushed, however,  it is important to remember that oral hygiene is part of personal care and that brushing is not just dismissed because your resident has declined to have their teeth brushed at that time and in that place.

    Think about how you would feel if you weren’t able brush your teeth for 2 weeks.

    Remember do unto others ................ if you clean your teeth twice a day with a brush and paste, then that’s the minimum attention you should give your resident.

    Then think about how you would feel if you were reliant upon someone else to brush your teeth for you.

    • Be flexible - try prompting oral care at different times of the day and in a place where your resident feels comfortable, it doesn’t have to be in the bathroom!
    • Review the tools and products being used, are they appropriate for your resident? Look at the size of toothbrush head and strength of bristles, too big? Too hard?  Small, soft headed toothbrushes are recommended, such as our Tepe Special Compact Toothbrush.
    • Use an SLS free (non-foaming) toothpaste,  this has a tremendous benefit to your residents who have to have mouth care delivered by a carer as it will greatly reduce the risk and fear of aspiration and also take away any potential choking and gagging risk. It also allows carers to see if there are any problems in the mouth.
    • It is important NOT to wet the tooth brush as this will avoid unnecessary liquid in the mouth, and only use a pea size amount of paste, as, again, this will greatly reduce the risk and fear of aspiration and also take away any potential choking and gagging risk.
    • Always approach your resident to assist them with their oral care either from the side or at the front of them and always at their level. Try using the Chaining or the Bridging methods to help support your resident to brush their teeth them selves
    • Talk to your resident calmly and kindly, and tell them what you are doing throughout the care to help build their trust and confidence.
    • Consider also, carer preference, if there is a particular carer that your resident enjoys a good rapport with, there will most likely be able to achieve a more positive outcome.
    • Think about introducing a system of brushing, eg always start brushing from left to right so that you can monitor which teeth have been brushed if you have to split mouth care into short bursts.
    • Record oral care in care plans including refusal, so that it is documented that you have attempted to deliver that care, but it is your residents’ choice not to have it.
    • Remember that any changes in oral care that are currently being delivered need to be managed in small steps to allow your resident to get used to new ways. Small introductions of change will enable you to gauge how well things are working and how well your resident is responding to and is compliant with new introductions, workings and tools.

    And finally and above all, always remember that you are dealing with one of the most intimate areas of your resident’s body which is used for lots of lovely things, eating, talking and kissing.

    When delivering oral care - ‘Look beyond the illness and reach out to the person who needs to feel secure, respected and cherished’.

    To learn more about oral care and Dementia as well as other highly dependent and medically compromised residents, and to get QCQ ready for the new oral care quality standards for adults in care homes,  book your places today and join us at our CPD accredited seminar:

    ‘How to achieve CQC compliancy in oral care for adults in care homes’

    Please click on the link for full details of the event, which is certificated.

  • How ready are you to meet the new CQC Quality Standard – Oral Care in Care Homes?

    On 7th June 2017, NICE Quality Standard 'Oral Care in Care Homes' was published.  It recommends that residents in care homes have their oral health needs assessed on admission and recorded in their personal care plans, and are supported to clean their teeth twice a day and/or their dentures daily.

    The Care Quality Commission (CQC) expects care managers to take account of the nationally recognised guidance, including CQC Guidance from NICE, in essence, CQC want to see care homes prioritizing oral care.  Also, being able to evidence how you support residents to maintain good oral health will help you to demonstrate that your service is both effective and responsive.

    Included in the guide below are the tools to help you make those improvements:

    Improving Oral Health for Adults in Care Homes - A Quick Guide for Care Home Managers in association with NICE and SCIE -  which highlights areas for Care Managers to focus on

    We know that many of you social care managers and your staff out there know what is expected of you when it comes to supporting your residents with oral care, but due to a lack of available training, fit for purpose oral care product solutions, tools and resources, are unaware of the best practices and how to implement these.

    Here at Hcsuk, we really want to help and support you to achieve compliancy, and are therefore really proud and excited to announce that we have teamed up with Jane Peterson, RDH, BSc, Dental and Healthcare Professional and founder of oral health training company Oral Health Matters, to host:

    Our First CPD Accredited Seminar

    ‘How to achieve CQC compliancy in oral care for adults in care homes’

    Wednesday 20th September 2017

    8.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m.

    at

    Jury’s Inn, East Midlands Airport

    £99 per person

    Including refreshments, networking opportunities, car parking and buffet lunch

    To book this course now, please go to https://hcsuk-oral-health.eventbrite.co.uk

    As well as teaching you best practice in assisting and supporting your residents on oral health matters, these best practices will demonstrate to your stakeholders that you prioritise oral care.

    Who should attend this course?

    This oral care seminar is designed for all staff who are involved in the personal care of residents, senior care staff including care managers, oral champions, learning and development leads and trainers.

    What are the course objectives?

    To raise awareness of the importance of daily mouth care for older people in residential care and to provide practical advice on oral care techniques. Carers will be provided with the knowledge and ability to plan and deliver daily mouth care within residential and nursing care homes.  This course combines the practical and theoretical aspects of our basic and advanced level courses to deliver a complete guide to oral care provision for the elderly in care homes.

    Which topics does the course cover?

    • The mouth and teeth
    • Oral health and the body
    • Daily oral care
    • Denture care
    • Oral care and dementia
    • For highly dependent and medically compromised residents
    • Oral health assessments
    • Mouth Care Policy in accordance with NICE Guidelines and CQC recommendations

    What are the expected learning outcomes for you and your staff?

    On successful completion of this course delegates will be able to:

    • Identify basic dental anatomy and recognise abnormalities
    • Carry out mouth care assessments for residents in care homes
    • Create oral care plans for all residents
    • Outline the potential effects of poor oral health on individual's general health and well-being
    • Provide daily mouth care for all residents
    • Use newly learned oral hygiene techniques
    • Deliver denture care
    • Acknowledge coping strategies for residents with challenging behaviour towards mouth care
    • Provide daily mouth care for highly dependent and medically compromised residents including:
      • Dementia
      • Nil by mouth
      • Palliative care

    Meet Jane, our trainer for the day

     

     

     

     

    Jane Peterson RDH, BSc

    Jane has completed a Bachelor of Science degree in Oral Health Promotion, which highlighted to her the need for Oral Health Promotion in Care Homes and enabled Jane to reflect on oral health status and develop preventive strategies for care staff and the elderly in care homes. Jane carries out oral healthcare visits in a number of care homes and because of her experience she understands the challenges some residents pose with daily oral care. Jane currently works in General Practice 1 day a week, the rest of her time is dedicated to teaching and speaking at group meetings and seminars nationally to Dental and Healthcare Professionals.

    We have limited spaces available and we are expecting a high level of demand for this event so we recommend that you book your places today to avoid disappointment!

    So here’s that link again: https://hcsuk-oral-health.eventbrite.co.uk

    We look forward to sharing our knowledge with you on the day.

  • Keep Active Top 5

    We've noticed in recent weeks the growing coverage of how keeping active can help people with a dementia to reconnect to lost parts of themselves. Here's our Top 5 selection of how you can help, in no particular order.

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  • What could you achieve in just one hour?

    Do you think it's possible to change a life in on hour? We certainly do and a recent study adds credence to that belief.

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  • Superior Senses - How Engaging the Senses Can Help with Dementia Symptoms

    As humans we are led through the world by our senses, our taste, smell, sight, hearing and sense of touch help us connect to the world around us. Often with the onset of dementia these senses can be dulled or conversely, over-stimulated but when they are used to reconnect to memories and past joys, then they help bypass the barriers created by dementia.

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  • Dignified Dining for All

    In case your missed our Facebook Live yesterday, here's Jo revealing the very personal reasons why the Dignified Dining Solutions Guide has come to fruition and how we hope it'll help you and those in your care.

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