Due to Covid-19 restrictions, our mobility shop is closed for onsite purchasing, however you can still place orders through our website portal or via click and collect. 

Training

  • Our MD, Jo Bonser will be speaking live at the Care and Dementia Expo on September 15th, will you be joining us?

    Jo will be sharing her personal story of helping to care for her Mum, which has led her to help care homes improve their mealtime experience for people living with dementia.

    Jo told us:

    In November of 2016, my sister and I were told our Mum wouldn’t survive Christmas.

    These are the words no one ever wants to hear about their loved one, but my Mum’s GP warned us that Mum had given up on life and was ready to die.

    There was no denying that Mum was really poorly, living at home with vascular dementia aged 95, she had suffered 3 falls, several urinary and chest infections and had no appetite or interest in eating or drinking resulting in dramatic weight loss and dehydration. She would not pick up a knife or fork to eat and if you tried to assist her with a meal she would turn away from you.

    However, my Mum was an incredibly strong, and stubborn, lady and we weren’t prepared to just accept what the care professionals said, so we set to work to do whatever we could to help her recover.

    With my, then, 26 years experience from working in the care sector, and having some knowledge of nutrition and hydration for our elders, I decided to take charge of Mum’s mealtimes and began to observe her mealtime behaviours to see what I could do to improve her dining experience and ultimately her nutrition levels.

    I learned that getting people with dementia to eat can be challenging, and that complex interaction with the mealtime environment, plus many eating difficulties can prevent their nutritional intake.

    Following research, I found an online mealtime assessment tool and started to observe Mum’s mealtime behaviours, to identify, find solutions and create a care plan to help overcome her mealtime eating difficulties with the goal of bringing enjoyment for her at mealtimes, giving her back her mealtime independence, preventing malnutrition and improving her quality of life.

    The assessment tool provided me with a list of suggested interventions of which I chose several to trial with Mum including:

    • Decluttering the mealtime environment to reduce confusion levels.
    • Reducing noise levels resulting in a calmer setting which improved her nutrition
    • Introducing adapted crockery and cutlery to help her regain eating independence
    • Eating with her to make mealtimes more social occasions

    Mum’s transformation was miraculous! Within weeks, Mum was back to eating completely independently, enjoying her meals and gaining weight.

    The care professionals couldn’t believe her transformation and her end-of-life care nurse, Sally, stopped her visits saying ‘you don’t need my help anymore!’

    Having seen Mum’s transformation, I wanted to share my learnings with others, who were caring for people with dementia, to enable them to also experience more positive and dignified mealtimes and improved nutrition.

    And so Mum provided me with the inspiration to write my guide, as a free resource, with one aim – to help people with dementia achieve the most dignified, independent and delicious dining experience possible.

    I had walked a mile in the shoes of those who care for people with dementia. I had faced their challenges, and I had been able to overcome them and I wanted to share the strategies which had worked for us.

    I wanted to empower care managers and their teams and family members caring for people living with dementia to understand they CAN make a big difference in the way they support their people to lead to improved engagement, enjoyment at mealtimes

    I wanted them to really think about how their dining experience made their residents feel by putting themselves in their shoes.

    Would their dining experience pass the ‘Mum’ test - would it be good enough for their loved ones? And if not why should it be good enough for anyone else?

    My guide is designed for busy care managers, combining solutions to common mealtime challenges, packed with best practice guidance and tips to improve the dementia mealtime experience and ideas of product solutions that are available to be enabling for people with dementia. All from one trusted source, to save them valuable time.

    My guide launched in 2017 and was requested and distributed to many different care professionals and types of organisations, more than I could have imagined:

    OT’s, care home managers, local authorities, care trainers, CQC inspectors, SALT teams, dietitians, care quality consultants, care catering specialists, end of life nurses, home care companies are just some of the people who have had copies and have fed back what a valuable resource it has been.

    Following feedback from a senior dietitian within the BDA, who highly rated it and helped me with areas to improve, I updated it in 2018 and very much see it as an evolving resource as I learn more and more research is done.

    In 2018, I delivered ‘The Dementia Mealtime Challenge’, an interactive workshop I created based on my guide, at the National Association of Care Catering annual training and development forum. Several people who were present, have since come back to say thank you we have implemented all the suggestions from your workshop!

    This is now available as a workshop for teams in care homes who are serious about looking at ways to improve their mealtime experience.

    2019 saw me start my first consultancy project after an outstanding care provider approached me to work with them on a project to further improve their already excellent mealtime experience. This led to me developing a range of services to offer care homes including:

    • Mealtime observational audits
    • Enabling independence at mealtimes assessments for individuals
    • Creating enabling dining environment audits for people living with dementia
    • Mealtime equipment audit
    • Partnership working with care teams on improvement plans and implementation.
    • Retained support to measure continuous improvement.

    I am passionate about helping people and sharing my knowledge, and with my own experience and care sector background would love to work with more care homes to help them too.

     

    I am thrilled to be speaking in the Dementia Theatre at the Care and Dementia show, and also to be providing a further sensory learning experience and a fun competition with great prizes we are offering if you come and see us on our stand at the show.

     

     

    Download your own copy of our Dignified Dining Solution Guide below or visit our website at www.hcsuk.co.uk.

    Many people have asked me, ‘how much is your guide?’ and they are delighted when I tell them it’s free and I call it my little gift to the universe.’

     

  • Are you that special, wear your heart on your sleeve kind of person we’re looking for?

    Do you feel passionate about helping to improve the quality of peoples’ lives?

    Do you currently, or have you had experience of working in a care environment?

    Can you empathise with the challenges care providers and managers face striving to deliver the best possible outcomes for the ladies and gents they support whilst working towards improving compliance and CQC ratings?

    Do you also possess effective sales skills to help generate growth in revenue and profitability for your organisation?

    Are you looking for a new, exciting and unique challenge and are based in or around the East Midlands area?

    If you can answer yes to these questions, then we have a highly rewarding customer focused role for you.
    Continue reading

  • The Dementia Mealtime Challenge - Are you up for it?

    We may not have the grandest stand and we definitely don’t have the biggest marketing and merchandising budget, so it was particularly lovely to get great feedback, when a lady who visited our stand at the NACC National Association of Care Caterings Training and Development Forum from last week gave us her prize for the’ Best Stand of the Day.’

    Continue reading

  • MD Jo Is Honoured To Be Presenting National Interactive Workshop

    Yayy! I’m absolutely thrilled and honoured to have been invited to present an interactive workshop, ‘To Help People with a Dementia to Eat Better’, at this year’s National Association of Care Catering (NACC) training and development forum coming up in October.

    The NACC is an organisation who, for more than 30 years, has been committed to raising standards of care catering and championing the positive impact nutrition, hydration and mealtimes have on the physical and emotional health and wellbeing of the elderly and vulnerable in care settings. It unites supports and represents everyone working in and associated with catering in the UK care sector. It is recognised as a respected source of information and opinion for the dynamic and growing area of care catering.

    Continue reading

  • Helping Care Homes to Deliver Excellent Oral Care to the People They Support

    On September 20th we held our first CPD accredited seminar which focussed on providing great oral care for elderly and vulnerable residents in care homes and also to enable care homes to become compliant with the new CQC quality standards in oral care.

    All of our delegates learnt how to take a person centred approach to better assess and manage oral care for the people they support, gained knowledge about the latest innovative and fit for purpose product solutions to use (and more importantly which products to avoid) and they also got the chance to practice on each other, even our MD Jo didn’t escape without being a guinea pig!

    Continue reading

  • Hcsuk Team Members become Disability Confident

    On Wednesday 13th September, Hcsuk team members Jo, Beckie and Phil attended a Disability Confident Course hosted by the Warrington Disability Partnership in conjunction with the British Healthcare Trades Association.

    The course has been designed, by people who themselves have disabilities, to help people working within the care industry, to consider the barriers faced by disabled people, gain a better understanding of the term ‘disability’ and most importantly to increase ‘disability confidence’ and to see a person first, not just their disability.

    Continue reading

6 Item(s)